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About Chandelier

About Chandelier (7)

18
Jun2013

Czech glass is a very famous concept. Archaeological discoveries have confirmed the existence of glass production in Czech countries since the 9th century. Discoveries in Northern Bohemia (Jablonec in particular) together with bills of sale support the hypothesis that glassworks existed there from the mid-14th century.

Czech glass is a symbol of quality, craftsmanship, unique style, beauty and also low prices. It became a sought-after product and dominated the European market since the 17th century. Pure colourless glass called "Czech crystal" produced at that time in Bohemia was ideal for engraving and cutting and it was superior to other crystal glass for more than one century. A hundred years later it was discovered that adding lead oxide markedly improved the crystal's optical qualities. That is how leaded crystal originated and spread all over the world.

In 1724, the glass cutter Josef Palme obtained a royal warrant for chandelier production. The first workshop used for manufacturing chandeliers was founded in a small village of Prácheň near the city Kamenický Šenov in Northern Bohemia. Czech crystal chandeliers were very popular in Europe until the mid-18th century and they influenced development and style of future chandeliers all over the world.

Czech crystal chandeliers were also sought-after by the aristocracy. The palaces of the French king Louis XV, the Austrian Empress Maria Theresa and the Russian Czarina Elizabeth were ornamented with the original, perfect Palme’s chandeliers. Czech crystal chandeliers were a sign of good taste, wealth and nobility and they became as prestigious as expensive jewellery. The glitter of Czech crystal chandeliers enhances the brilliance of castles and palaces; it illuminates parliaments, governmental residences, universities, concert halls, cathedrals and sanctums across the globe. For instance, Czech crystal chandeliers hang in Milan's La Scala, Rome's Royal Opera, in Versailles, in the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg and in the residence of King Ibn Saud in Riyadh.

Czech crystal chandeliers are deservedly called "crystal sun" – a sun which never sets and forever remains the jewel in the crown of the Czech glass art.

More information about Czech glass

Would you like to know more about Czech glass, its history and our chandelier production technology? More information on these pages:

18
Jun2013

Scarce availability and difficulty of rock crystal processing forced people to look for a similar material somewhere else rather than trying to obtain it from the mountains. The technology of glass production met this need.

In the glass industry, the word "crystal" came into use when the first truly colourless glass was successfully produced. Historic glass contained high amount of iron oxide because of the raw materials used for producing glass. Iron oxide combined with the use of old furnaces created the typical intensive green shade of ancient and medieval glass.

In terms of the preparation and melting raw materials, the most important discoveries were made on a small island of Murano near Venice at the turn of the Middle Ages and the early modern period. People in Murano managed to produce colourless glass for the first time in history. People began to use colourless glass for producing luxury items similar to those which were created from rock glass until then.

The people of Murano jealously guarded their valuable discoveries. A glass maker who would try to leak the secret from Murano would have risked his life. However, even such extreme precautions could not stop the eventual leak of the colourless glass discovery and glass makers all over the Europe eagerly took up the new technique.


More information about Czech glass

Would you like to know more about Czech glass, its history and our chandelier production technology? More information on these pages:

18
Jun2013

The terms crystal and glass differ from country to country. For the Western world, the word "crystal" usually indicates the presence of lead. According to the European Union rules, glass products containing less than 4% of lead oxide are labelled as "glass". Next, products containing more than 10% of lead oxide are labelled as "crystal" and products containing more than 30% of lead oxide are labelled as "high-lead crystal". In the USA, the situation is different – the glass is labelled as "crystal" if it contains at least 1% of lead oxide. In the Czech Republic, the term "crystal" is used for any exquisite, high quality glass. Therefore "leaded crystal" means that the crystal contains more than 24% of lead oxide.

The presence of lead softens the glass and makes it more suitable for cutting and engraving. Lead increases the weight of the glass and causes the glass to refract light. Glass used for making figurines contains up to 49% of lead in order to achieve maximum malleability. If crystal contains less than 24% of lead, it has a higher proportion of barium oxide which ensures that the light refracts well.

The difference between glass and crystal can be seen by a naked eye. Apart from glass, a crystal chandelier casts a spectrum of colours around the room. If the content of lead is higher, the chandelier is more sparkling.

More information about Czech glass

Would you like to know more about Czech glass, its history and our chandelier production technology? More information on these pages:

18
Jun2013

The word "crystal" comes from Ancient Greek and it means ice which is, similarly to real crystal, characterized by purity, clarity and coolness. Greeks were always surprised when ordinary water turned into "rock". But they soon discovered that something resembling ice can be found deep in the mountains – they found colourless, pure, transparent and cold monocrystals of silicon dioxide. The Greek word for ice was quickly transferred to this sought-after material and since then these colourless silica monocrystals are known as rock crystal or quartz.

However, people were fascinated by rock crystal even before the Greek civilization; it can be even said that it is an important part of human history. It is astonishing how quickly ancient civilizations learnt to cut rock crystal using sand, a material of equal hardness. Rock crystal was used to make jewellery, luxury items for the upper classes and also items related to magic. This led to the perception of crystal as something noble and mysterious. Even nowadays every oracle needs a crystal ball.


More information about Czech glass

Would you like to know more about Czech glass, its history and our chandelier production technology? More information on these pages:

18
Jun2013

At the turn of the 16th and 17th century, Bohemia became the world centre of crystal glass production. The original crystal contained a high volume of sodium oxide which was used as a smelter. This simplified the crystal production but the glass had relatively low hardness. Therefore carving couldn't be used for decorating glass products, although this was the main technique used in rock crystal processing.

Important technological discoveries made during the crystal production era in Bohemia led to a formation of ideal crystal glass which was particularly suitable for cutting and engraving. This glass called Czech crystal was the absolute top of the crystal glass industry for more than one century.


More information about Czech glass

Would you like to know more about Czech glass, its history and our chandelier production technology? More information on related pages:

18
Jun2013

The dust settles not only on the shelves and on the floor, but also on your lighting. It is therefore advisable to clean the chandeliers regularly because dusty trimmings can reduce the shine and sparkle of crystal chandeliers. It is not difficult to clean a chandelier, you just have to follow several easy steps and it might even become fun.

In CHATEAU DE VERSAILLES CHANDELIER we tried several procedures but the oldest one is still the best and simplest. Our grandmothers have cleaned chandeliers this way and no miraculous spray has surpassed it.

  1. First, turn the lights off and make sure that nobody turns it on during cleaning.
  2. Gradually remove crystal trimmings from the chandelier; start from the bottom part of the chandelier. Wash the trimmings in a lukewarm detergent solution, rinse with water and wipe with a cloth. In the same way wash and dry all the glass parts of the chandelier that can be removed.
  3. Metal and glass parts that cannot be removed can be cleaned with a moistened microfibre cloth. Do not use any chemical cleaning products (or detergents). If you have a good microfibre cloth, you can wash the whole chandelier with it (without any detergent). From our experience with chandeliers' maintenance, we recommend a proven blue cloth by Raypath which you can use for cleaning the whole chandelier including crystal trimmings. If you rinse and wring the cloth, it doesn't leave any smudges. It has a similar effect to traditional chamois leather used for cleaning cars. This way you save your money and protect the environment as well as skin on your hands which does not benefit from being in water with detergent.
  4. In the end put back the washed and dried trimmings and parts of the chandelier. If you are afraid that you won't remember their correct position, draw a small plan of the chandelier or take photos during dismantling.


We recommend maintaining and cleaning the chandelier twice a year according to the dust level in the environment where the chandelier is placed. At least once a year the chandelier should be washed. If you wash it at the beginning of winter, the chandeliers will shine beautifully during Christmas – similarly to the chandeliers in our Gallery.

Would you like to know more about chandeliers, Czech crystal, its history and production technology? See the related article.

18
Jun2013

A crystal chandelier in modern interior

A baroque church, ceremonial hall or a hall in a castle. These are classic interiors where most people would imagine a crystal chandelier to be hung. It is logical because crystal chandeliers were pride of aristocratic families for centuries and they also emphasized the beauty of ecclesiastical buildings.

The fixed stereotype of a crystal chandelier appearing only in fairy tales or castles is slowly changing these days. Crystal chandeliers are being bought by people who prefer classic beauty and stylish interiors. Also young architects, artists and people interested in contemporary design are starting to admire the beauty of sparkling trimmings. Nowadays, crystal chandeliers are being used more often in modern interiors.

Only a few manufacturers can actually meet this demand and offer not only classic chandeliers, but also new models which would maintain the classic chandeliers’ original beauty but introduce it with a new image. You can look at our Gallery and see if we succeeded in this difficult task.


How to choose a crystal chandelier for your interior

A new chandelier has to fulfil two basic conditions:

  • You like it at first sight.
  • It has an appropriate price which you are willing to accept.


In addition, the chandelier also has to meet other criteria.

  • The size, shape and style of the chandelier must be adequate for the size of the interior, height of the ceiling and style of your room.
  • The chandelier has to shine with sufficient intensity. It is important to decide what size of room the chandelier should illuminate and whether it will be the only light source in the interior. Insufficient lighting of your interior can be solved by adding another chandelier or by complementing it by wall lamps, table lamps or spot lights.


Choosing a suitable colour of the chandelier

  • Apart from colourless crystal chandeliers, we also offer crystal chandeliers of various colours.
  • It is more difficult to harmonize coloured chandeliers with colours of your interior decor and what is more, in future it might be also complicated to realize any changes concerning colours in your interior.
  • Clear crystal chandeliers are much more universal and they can fit into interiors of various styles and colours. When choosing colourless crystal chandeliers, you have to consider whether golden or silver coloured metal parts are more suitable. Usually you can follow the colour of your door and window handles.
  • Neutral crystal chandeliers with silver coloured metal are the most universal. Silver colour is not so prominent and the chandelier also seems to be clearer than the chandeliers with golden coloured metal parts since the golden colour is more prominent.


How to hang the chandelier properly

  • If the chandelier is placed in an open space and people will be walking under it, the bottom part of the chandelier needs to be at least 190-197 cm above the floor, which is the approximate height of common door frames. So everyone who can walk through you door will be also able to walk under your chandelier.
  • If the chandelier will hang over the table, coffee table, desk or piano, it can be hung lower, about 170 cm above the floor. If the chandelier hangs above the table, it is important that the table is wide enough so that you don't touch the chandelier with your head.


Hanging the chandelier

  • When hanging the chandelier, the hook should be installed on the ceiling of your room according to instructions given specifically for your ceiling. Also for safety reasons, the load capacity of the ceiling needs to be twice the chandelier's weight.


If you still haven't decided whether a crystal chandelier is suitable for your interior, maybe our Gallery can convince you.

Would you like to know more about chandeliers, Czech crystal, its history and production technology? See the related article.